[PLUG-TALK] Jesus was an anarchist.

Jeme A Brelin jeme at brelin.net
Mon Oct 20 19:12:13 PDT 2003


I don't know what y'all know about the apocrypha, but damn...

I'm not a religious person.  I am not mystic and I don't really believe in
any supernatural stuff.  But I figure there's a good chance there was a
guy named Jesus and he told people they should be good and they rich
fuckers strung him up because being good means an end to greed and
tyranny.

Anyway, there's the whole deal with apostles and the books they wrote.

I think the apostles had their own ideas about what Jesus was all about.
Some were really superstitious types who thought he was the one true Son
of God and others were more skeptical and rational.  Thomas was probably
the most down-to-Earth of the bunch... that's why they called him
"Doubting Thomas", you know.

Anyway, his book was cut out of the canonical Holy Bible quite some time
ago.  It's considered a Gnostic book.  It's based on the idea that the
kingdom of heaven is gained through understanding and wisdom and some kind
of enlightenment rather than direct communion with a particular
supernatural creature.

Anyway, Thomas wrote a Gospel, too.  He titled his, too... he called it,
"The Secret Sayings of Jesus Christ".  I think he knew damned well that he
was publishing an account of the man that most folks wouldn't accept.
After all, he was leaving out the sensationalism.

I'm going to copy here my two favorite verses from Thomas.  I think they
give a great idea of what Jesus was really all about.  He was an anarchist
and he saw that a better world was being held back by only greed.  (Even
the canonical Bible is very clear on Jesus opposition to lenders, renters,
and other exploiters of man.)

Enjoy.

64. Jesus said, "A person was receiving guests. When he had prepared the
dinner, he sent his slave to invite the guests. The slave went to the
first and said to that one, 'My master invites you.' That one said, 'Some
merchants owe me money; they are coming to me tonight. I have to go and
give them instructions. Please excuse me from dinner.' The slave went to
another and said to that one, 'My master has invited you.' That one said
to the slave, 'I have bought a house, and I have been called away for a
day. I shall have no time.' The slave went to another and said to that
one, 'My master invites you.' That one said to the slave, 'My friend is to
be married, and I am to arrange the banquet. I shall not be able to come.
Please excuse me from dinner.' The slave went to another and said to that
one, 'My master invites you.' That one said to the slave, 'I have bought
an estate, and I am going to collect the rent. I shall not be able to
come. Please excuse me.' The slave returned and said to his master, 'Those
whom you invited to dinner have asked to be excused.' The master said to
his slave, 'Go out on the streets and bring back whomever you find to have
dinner.' Buyers and merchants will not enter the places of my Father."

65. He said, "A person owned a vineyard and rented it to some farmers, so
they could work it and he could collect its crop from them. He sent his
slave so the farmers would give him the vineyard's crop. They grabbed him,
beat him, and almost killed him, and the slave returned and told his
master. His master said, 'Perhaps they didn't know him.' He sent another
slave, and the farmers beat that one as well. Then the master sent his son
and said, 'Perhaps they'll show my son some respect.' Because the farmers
knew that he was the heir to the vineyard, they grabbed him and killed
him. Anyone here with two ears had better listen!"

J.
-- 
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     Jeme A Brelin
    jeme at brelin.net
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